For the Birds Benefit Dinner and Auction 2011

 

Via Rail Winners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 2nd  2011 “For the Birds” Benefit Dinner and Auction.

This year’s event was held at the Château Vaudreuil Suites Pavillion.

A BIG thank you goes to all of the sponsors and auction donors that 
graciously provided gifts and services for our 2011 benefit event. 

view the list

Event Photos

Bird Conservation Story Number Five

Cedar WaxwingCedar waxwing (fledgling)

Issue: This healthy waxwing was captured by a well meaning person.

Treatment: Le Nichoir first tried to reunite the waxwing with its parents but was not able to find the exact location where the bird was found. The Centre decided to care for this fledgling until it was mature enough and able to fly.

Result: The waxwing stayed at the Centre for 3 weeks. It was placed in one of the outdoor aviaries where it was able to fly and was fed a variety of different naturals foods, similar to those found in the wild.

Did you know? That baby birds that fledge (fledglings) fall or are thrown from the nest even though they cannot fly? They will roam around, on the ground, for up to 3 weeks before they can fly away. During this time, the parents will feed them every couple of hours and protect them from predators. If you find a fledgling bird, the best thing is to leave it be. This is part of their growing process, and part of nature.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.

Bird Conservation Story Number Four

Chipping Sparrow (adult)Chipping Sparrow (adult)

Issue: This sparrow was brought to the Centre because it flew into a resident of Hudson’s bay window.

Treatment: The bird was not moving and in shock. It was placed in the Bird Protection Quebec’s “Quiet Room” to recuperate where there is minimal noise and no visitors. It was given pain management and within 48 hours, the sparrow was flying normally and ready for release.

Result: A young volunteer released the sparrow back where it was found, near Cameron Street, and it was able to rejoin its small flock.

Did you know? You can prevent wild birds from hitting your windows by hanging ribbons, drawing designs with a yellow highlighter (birds can see ultra-violet light) or by putting silhouettes of birds of prey in your window. You can also spray soapy water on the glass to reduce the reflection.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.

Bird Conservation Story Number Three

Canada goose (gosling – approx. 2 months old)Canada goose (gosling – approx. 2 months old)

Issue: This gosling’s mother nested beside Highway 40 in Pointe-Claire. Once the gosling hatched, the mother got scared off by traffic and abandoned her young. Someone found him (or her), on the service road, and brought him to Le Nichoir.

Treatment: The gosling was immediately rehydrated, fed and weighed.

Result: With the help of a couple from Hudson, Le Nichoir reintroduced the gosling to a pair of Canada geese and their two goslings (who were about the same age). The adult pair accepted the new gosling. The new family grazed then swam away together.

Did you know? Feeding all birds with bread can be dangerous for them. Bread becomes extremely sticky when wet and it can cause crop (food storage pouch in neck) impaction, which can result in death. Bread is very filling and it stops birds from eating more nutritional and natural foods which provide them with the essential minerals and nutrients they need to grow and be healthy. Instead of bread, consider feeding ducks and geese wild bird seed, dry cat kibble, greens (lettuce, broccoli, etc) and corn.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.

Bird Conservation Story Number Two

Pileated woodpecker (male)Pileated woodpecker (male)

Issue: This Pileated woodpecker injured itself banging the aluminum siding of a home with its beak causing a coracoids wing fracture.

Treatment: The woodpecker’s wing was carefully bandaged for 14 days and pain management was provided.

Result: This bird was released in Sherbrooke (QC) where it was found.

Did you know? Woodpeckers will bang and peck at aluminum roofs and siding of homes and buildings to make as much noise as possible to attract mates. This behavior is only temporary and will last the first few weeks of summer.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.

Bird Conservation Story Number One

White-winged scoterWhite-winged scoter

Males are all black except for white around the eye and a white speculum (wing feathers).

Issue: this duck had lead-poisoning most probably from consuming an old fishing lead lure sitting on the bottom of the St. Lawrence River.

Treatment: Le Nichoir provided supportive care such as food, warmth and treated the duck with drugs to reduce the lead levels.

Result: the Scoter was released with a large flock of other Scoters in Valois Bay this winter.

Did you know? Scoters are only seen in the Montreal area during the winter as they migrate from the most Northern tips of Canada to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission. 

Beaconsfield Pet Fare

Le Nichoir will be participating again this year in Beaconsfield’s Pet fair being held on September 11th at Centennial Hall Park from 11am – 4pm. Visit Le Nichoir’s educational table to learn more about wild birds in your back yard, and come meet other non-profits dedicated to helping both wildlife and domestic animals.

Centennial Hall Park 288 boul. Beaconsfield, Beaconsfield. (September 2010)

 

 

 

Junior Birdwatchers

Junior Birdwatchers

Special thanks to Mountain Equipment Co-op, who have kindly donated binoculars and Field Guides for the Birds in our Backyard Children’s Educational Program. (Link to MEC) (September 2010)

Le Nichoir’s Wildcard 2010

The Wildcard event is …

Wildcard

  • An event taking place Saturday, August 21st at the old Dominion Textile building on the Lachine Canal in Montreal.
  • A sale of over 500 five by seven size Canadian and international art, signed on the reverse and sold for $65.
  • A fun, fast paced sale because although the art is previewed, the buyer cannot see the artist’s signature until the purchase is complete and the card is handed to them.
  • Online preview of the entire Wildcard collection now on line.
  • Tickets 450 458 2901 or visit event website for pickup locations.

Event Website

Question from Danielle in Hudson, QC

Migration means heading north in spring and south in fall, so why am I seeing geese heading north now?

It is true, the geese are flying north in fall! Geese are not in a hurry to head south, rather, they mosey along food patch to food patch. If the food is no longer available because it has been eaten or been covered by snow, then it really is time to move on. They also need open water where they can spend the nights safe from predators. This region offers both. With the Lake of Two Mountains and great forage in the fields around this area, we offer a great stop-over for these snow-birds.
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