Wildcard 2011

The Wildcard is …
An art market taking place Saturday November 19th at Collège Sainte-Anne in Lachine, QC.

300 artists who have created over 650 Wildcards

A sale of 5” by 7” size unframed original art, signed on the reverse and sold for $65 (the average cost to rehabilitate and release one bird back into the wild).

A fun, fast paced sale. The art is previewed but the buyer cannot see the artist’s signature until the purchase is complete and the card is handed to them.

Lindsay D’Aoust : 450 458 2901 email : communication@lenichoir.org

Event Website

Vernissage Fundraiser: Friday Sept.16, 6-9 pm

Anne Brisson – “An Avian Miscellany”

Dodo

“Inspired by Le Nichoir and their cause to rehabilitate birds back into the wild, this collection focuses on Birds and Fowl executed in the spirit of collage painting and steampunk sculpture. After spending 10 days in Spain in May under the tutelage of Nick Bantock, I have learned to bring more colour and depth to my works. I hope you enjoy this collection of Avian Miscellany as much as I have enjoyed creating it!” – Anne

Exhibition: September 15-18, 2011 – 6-9 pm

Galerie ouest
37, rue Saint-Thomas Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue

Ring-billed Gull Release

On July 12 2011 over 170 Ring-billed Gulls were banded and released into an existing colony at Beauharnois, QC with the help of researchers from UQÀM. The group are studying the behavior of Ring-billed Gulls in urban and suburban settings. The released gulls had come to Le Nichoir as days old nestlings several weeks earlier after having fallen from the roof of an industrial building on Montée-de-Liesse in Ville Saint-Laurent.

The gulls were cared for by Le Nichoir staff and volunteers until they were deemed able to integrate into the existing colony and care for themselves. Many concerned individuals and companies made generous donations that allowed Le Nichoir to take on the challenge of caring for these birds.

Visit the reseach team’s website at goeland.uqam.ca and please report any sitings of these banded gulls to the team via their website. (July 2011)

Photo Album

Open House 2011

Everyone is welcome to attend our annual open house Saturday, July 16th from 10:00 am until 2:00 pm.

• Watch birds being hand fed
• Birdwatch with Lynn Miller in the Clarke-Sydenham reserve
• Observe birds being released (weather permitting)
• Children’s activities
• Watch a bird banding demonstration by the McGill Bird Observatory
• Take a tour of the center

BBQ lunch available from 11:00 am until 1:30 pm. For more information call the Centre at 450 458 2809 or email info@lenichoir.org

Susan Wylie, CBC’s Montrealer of the week

Le Nichoir’s Executive Director, Susan Wylie, was nominated as CBC’s Montrealer of the week on June 2, 2011

http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/News/Canada/Montreal/1305551527/ID=1967565240

For the Birds Benefit Dinner and Auction 2011

 

Via Rail Winners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 2nd  2011 “For the Birds” Benefit Dinner and Auction.

This year’s event was held at the Château Vaudreuil Suites Pavillion.

A BIG thank you goes to all of the sponsors and auction donors that 
graciously provided gifts and services for our 2011 benefit event. 

view the list

Event Photos

Bird Conservation Story Number Five

Cedar WaxwingCedar waxwing (fledgling)

Issue: This healthy waxwing was captured by a well meaning person.

Treatment: Le Nichoir first tried to reunite the waxwing with its parents but was not able to find the exact location where the bird was found. The Centre decided to care for this fledgling until it was mature enough and able to fly.

Result: The waxwing stayed at the Centre for 3 weeks. It was placed in one of the outdoor aviaries where it was able to fly and was fed a variety of different naturals foods, similar to those found in the wild.

Did you know? That baby birds that fledge (fledglings) fall or are thrown from the nest even though they cannot fly? They will roam around, on the ground, for up to 3 weeks before they can fly away. During this time, the parents will feed them every couple of hours and protect them from predators. If you find a fledgling bird, the best thing is to leave it be. This is part of their growing process, and part of nature.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.

Bird Conservation Story Number Four

Chipping Sparrow (adult)Chipping Sparrow (adult)

Issue: This sparrow was brought to the Centre because it flew into a resident of Hudson’s bay window.

Treatment: The bird was not moving and in shock. It was placed in the Bird Protection Quebec’s “Quiet Room” to recuperate where there is minimal noise and no visitors. It was given pain management and within 48 hours, the sparrow was flying normally and ready for release.

Result: A young volunteer released the sparrow back where it was found, near Cameron Street, and it was able to rejoin its small flock.

Did you know? You can prevent wild birds from hitting your windows by hanging ribbons, drawing designs with a yellow highlighter (birds can see ultra-violet light) or by putting silhouettes of birds of prey in your window. You can also spray soapy water on the glass to reduce the reflection.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.

Bird Conservation Story Number Three

Canada goose (gosling – approx. 2 months old)Canada goose (gosling – approx. 2 months old)

Issue: This gosling’s mother nested beside Highway 40 in Pointe-Claire. Once the gosling hatched, the mother got scared off by traffic and abandoned her young. Someone found him (or her), on the service road, and brought him to Le Nichoir.

Treatment: The gosling was immediately rehydrated, fed and weighed.

Result: With the help of a couple from Hudson, Le Nichoir reintroduced the gosling to a pair of Canada geese and their two goslings (who were about the same age). The adult pair accepted the new gosling. The new family grazed then swam away together.

Did you know? Feeding all birds with bread can be dangerous for them. Bread becomes extremely sticky when wet and it can cause crop (food storage pouch in neck) impaction, which can result in death. Bread is very filling and it stops birds from eating more nutritional and natural foods which provide them with the essential minerals and nutrients they need to grow and be healthy. Instead of bread, consider feeding ducks and geese wild bird seed, dry cat kibble, greens (lettuce, broccoli, etc) and corn.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.

Bird Conservation Story Number Two

Pileated woodpecker (male)Pileated woodpecker (male)

Issue: This Pileated woodpecker injured itself banging the aluminum siding of a home with its beak causing a coracoids wing fracture.

Treatment: The woodpecker’s wing was carefully bandaged for 14 days and pain management was provided.

Result: This bird was released in Sherbrooke (QC) where it was found.

Did you know? Woodpeckers will bang and peck at aluminum roofs and siding of homes and buildings to make as much noise as possible to attract mates. This behavior is only temporary and will last the first few weeks of summer.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission.