Bird Conservation Story Number One

White-winged scoterWhite-winged scoter

Males are all black except for white around the eye and a white speculum (wing feathers).

Issue: this duck had lead-poisoning most probably from consuming an old fishing lead lure sitting on the bottom of the St. Lawrence River.

Treatment: Le Nichoir provided supportive care such as food, warmth and treated the duck with drugs to reduce the lead levels.

Result: the Scoter was released with a large flock of other Scoters in Valois Bay this winter.

Did you know? Scoters are only seen in the Montreal area during the winter as they migrate from the most Northern tips of Canada to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

First published in the Hudson/Saint-Lazare Gazette and are reprinted here with permission. 

Beaconsfield Pet Fare

Le Nichoir will be participating again this year in Beaconsfield’s Pet fair being held on September 11th at Centennial Hall Park from 11am – 4pm. Visit Le Nichoir’s educational table to learn more about wild birds in your back yard, and come meet other non-profits dedicated to helping both wildlife and domestic animals.

Centennial Hall Park 288 boul. Beaconsfield, Beaconsfield. (September 2010)

 

 

 

Junior Birdwatchers

Junior Birdwatchers

Special thanks to Mountain Equipment Co-op, who have kindly donated binoculars and Field Guides for the Birds in our Backyard Children’s Educational Program. (Link to MEC) (September 2010)

Le Nichoir’s Wildcard 2010

The Wildcard event is …

 

  • An event taking place Saturday, August 21st at the old Dominion Textile building on the Lachine Canal in Montreal.
  • A sale of over 500 five by seven size Canadian and international art, signed on the reverse and sold for $65.
  • A fun, fast paced sale because although the art is previewed, the buyer cannot see the artist’s signature until the purchase is complete and the card is handed to them.
  • Online preview of the entire Wildcard collection now on line.
  • Tickets 450 458 2901 or visit event website for pickup locations.

 

Question from Danielle in Hudson, QC

Migration means heading north in spring and south in fall, so why am I seeing geese heading north now?

It is true, the geese are flying north in fall! Geese are not in a hurry to head south, rather, they mosey along food patch to food patch. If the food is no longer available because it has been eaten or been covered by snow, then it really is time to move on. They also need open water where they can spend the nights safe from predators. This region offers both. With the Lake of Two Mountains and great forage in the fields around this area, we offer a great stop-over for these snow-birds.
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